The 2022 Guide to Canadian Statutory Holidays, and Holiday Pay

FOR RESTAURANT OWNERS

Table of content

What is a statutory holiday in Canada?

A public holiday or sometimes called statutory holidays, stat days, are a variety of nationalistic or religious, cultural holidays that are legislated in Canada at the federal or provincial level. What does that all mean? As an employer you need to know what counts as a stat holiday, how they are treated differently in each province in Canada, which days are considered stat holidays and how the pay is calculated. Read on to find out everything you need to know about statutory holidays in British Columbia.

British Columbia

What are the statutory holidays in British Columbia?

• New Year's Day - January 1st

• Family Day - Third Monday in February

• Good Friday - Friday preceding Easter Sunday

• Victoria Day - Last Monday preceding May 25th

• Canada Day* - July 1st

• B.C. Day - First Monday in August

• Labour Day - First Monday in September

• Thanksgiving Day - Second Monday in October

• Remembrance Day - November 11

• Christmas Day - December 25th

Christmas?! While we’re talking about this wonderful time of year, you may want to bookmark our Tips on Managing Staff during the Holidays.

*If Canada Day falls on a Sunday, the following Monday is observed as the statutory holiday. It gets “bumped” to July 2nd, but this doesn’t happen again until July 2029, so you’ve got time.

2022 Updates: Easter Sunday, Easter Monday, National Day for Truth and Reconciliation and Boxing Day are not statutory holidays in B.C.

How does an employee qualify for statutory holiday pay in British Columbia?

To be eligible for stat holiday pay in British Columbia, employees must be employed for the past 30 calendar days and have worked or earned wages on 15 of the 30 days before the statutory holiday. It’s common to believe that you must work the day before and the day after the holiday in order to qualify for the pay but that’s not the case in BC. If the employee doesn’t qualify for statutory pay but works the day they receive regular pay.

  • For example: Joe works Monday to Friday, and the next stat holiday falls on a Friday. Joe has been employed for 3 years and has worked 19 days of the past 30 days, therefore he is eligible for stat pay.
  • Example: Peter has also been employed for the past three years. He generally works just Friday, Saturday, Sunday. In the past 30 days, he has worked 11 days, therefore Peter is not eligible for stat pay. If Peter works on the stat holiday, he gets paid his regular wage.

What is the stat holiday pay calculation for employees in British Columbia?

Calculating stat pay for our employees is a necessary and legal part of business but calculating it accurately makes your place a great place to work. Read our article here about other ways managing human capital helps small business owners retain and elevate great employees.

Public holiday pay would be calculated by referencing the past 30 calendar days before the holiday, including vacation days.

Here’s the equation:

Total wages ÷ number of days worked = statutory holiday pay (an average day's pay)

Include all wages - salary, vacation, commission, stat holiday pay but not overtime. This is the amount of holiday pay they would receive for that day.

For example: In the last 30 days, Patricia is paid $14/ hour and works 6 hour days. She has worked 17 days of the past 30. Since she has worked at least 15 days and has been employed longer than 30 days she is eligible for stat pay. She is also eligible for premium stat pay should she be scheduled for the day.

To calculate her statutory holiday pay:

  • Regular wages earned in the last 4 weeks = $14 x 6 hours = $84 + $3.36 (vacation pay, paid out per cheque).
  • Regular wages earned in the last 4 weeks = $14 x 6 hours = $84 + $3.36(vacation pay, paid out per cheque) = 87.36 * 17 days = 1485.12
  • $1485.12 / 17 = $87.36 in regular stat pay or 6 hours.

Example #2: Evan gets paid $17/hour and his hours the past 4 weeks are this: Week #1 = 36 hours (5 days); Week #2 = 41 hours (5 days); Week #3 = 31 hours (4 days); Week # 4 = 19 hours (4 days)

  • He has worked 15 of the past 30 and has been employed for longer than 30 days. His total wages = (36 +41+31+19 = 116 hours x $17/hour) = 1972 (+ vac pay of 4% added to each pay 78.88) = 2050.88
  • $2050.88/18 days = $113.94 or 6.7 hours.

Do part time employees get statutory holiday pay in British Columbia?

They sure do! If they qualify for it by working at least 15 days in the past 30 then part time employees get statutory holiday pay.

Stat premium pay calculation.

In addition to British Columbia stat holiday pay,employees who work on the day of the statutoryholiday, are entitled to time and a half for hoursworked on a statutory holiday. Double time for hours over 12 hours worked.

Here’s the calculation:

This is calculated at one and a half times the regular wage x the number of hours they worked. Regular hourly wage x 1.5 = Premium pay.

Premium Pay example:

Last pay period, Jane is paid $12/hour and works four 8 hour shifts. She also works an 8 hour shift on a stat holiday. She is eligible for both regular and premium stat pay.

To calculate her statutory holiday pay:

  • Regular wages earned in the last 4 weeks = $12 x 32 (8×4) hours = $384 + $15.36 (vacation pay, paid out per cheque)
  • $1485.12 / 17 = $87.36 in regular stat pay or 6 hours.

PLUS

  • 1.5 x ($12 x 8 hours) = $144 in premium pay
  • In total, Jane will be paid $163.97 in statutory pay

To sum it all up here is an example:

Ruby’s average day's pay is $120. On the statutory holiday, if Ruby:

  • Does not work, she's paid $120
  • Works 7 hours, she's paid time-and-a-half plus $120
  • Works 14 hours, she's paid time-and-a-half for 12 hours, plus double-time for two hours, plus $120

After that long read, your thoughts on calculating statutory holiday could go two ways:

  1. "Wow, I think I get it!" or
  2. "... I need to read that again."

If you haven't, that’s okay, we’re here to help. Whether you’ve got it or not, automating payroll will save you a load of time.

Download the guide here!

Click to download the 2022 guide to Canadian statutory holidays and holiday pay

Alberta

What are the general holidays in Alberta?

  • New Year's Day - January 1st
  • Alberta Family Day - Third Monday in February
  • Good Friday - Friday preceding Easter Sunday
  • Victoria Day - Last Monday preceding May 25th
  • Canada Day* - July 1st, except for when July 1st is a Sunday then it is moved to July 2nd (This doesn’t happen again until 2029, so you got some time)
  • Labour Day - First Monday in September
  • Thanksgiving Day - Second Monday in October
  • Remembrance Day - November 11
  • Christmas Day - December 25th

In addition to these nine holidays, Alberta has three optional stat holidays. It is up to the employer to decide to designate these days as stat holidays. If the employer agrees to any of these days, all employment standards rules related to stat holiday pay still apply for these additional holidays. The additional optional days are

  • Easter Monday - First Monday following Easter
  • Heritage Day - First Monday in August
  • Boxing Day - December 26

Boxing Day?! While we’re talking about this wonderful time of year, you may want to bookmark our Tips on Managing Staff during the Holidays.

How does an employee qualify for general holiday pay in Alberta?

Employees are entitled to statutory holiday pay if they have worked 30 workdays for the same employer in the 12 months prior to the holiday.

Most employees are eligible to receive stat holiday and receive statutory holiday pay if:

  • the statutory holiday is a regular workday
  • The employee works on the statutory holiday but is not a regular workday for the employee

If an employee is scheduled to work on the holiday and is absent without employer’s consent and employees must work their last regularly scheduled shift before the holiday as well as their first regularly scheduled shift after the holiday, if either of these conditions are not met then an employee is not entitled to stat holiday pay.

For example: Joe works Monday to Friday, and the next stat holiday falls on a Friday. Joe is scheduled to work on the Thursday before the holiday, and the Monday after the holiday. He must work these entire shifts to be eligible for stat pay. Joe has requested Monday off to extend his weekend. His manager approves his request, therefore Joe is still eligible for stat holiday pay.

However, if Joe's request is not accepted, and he does not show up, he will only be paid premium pay for the hours he has worked on the stat holiday.

What is the general holiday pay calculation for employees in Alberta in 2022?

Calculating stat pay for our employees is a necessary and legal part of business but calculating it accurately makes your place a great place to work. Read our article here about other ways managing human capital helps small business owners retain and elevate great employees.

Public holiday pay is calculated by adding up the number of wages your employee has earned in the 4 weeks prior to the holiday from the last and divide that by 20. This is the amount of holiday pay they would receive for that day.

Average daily wage is calculated as the employee's wages divided by the number of days the employee worked in either:

Premium Pay example:

Last pay period, Jane is paid $12/hour and works four 8 hour shifts. She also works an 8 hour shift on a stat holiday. She is eligible for both regular and premium stat pay.

To calculate her statutory holiday pay:

  • Regular wages earned in the last 4 weeks = $12 x 32 (8×4) hours = $384 + $15.36 (vacation pay, paid out per cheque)
  • $1485.12 / 17 = $87.36 in regular stat pay or 6 hours.

PLUS

  • 1.5 x ($12 x 8 hours) = $144 in premium pay
  • In total, Jane will be paid $163.97 in statutory pay

To sum it all up here is an example:

Ruby’s average day's pay is $120. On the statutory holiday, if Ruby:

  • Does not work, she's paid $120
  • Works 7 hours, she's paid time-and-a-half plus $120
  • Works 14 hours, she's paid time-and-a-half for 12 hours, plus double-time for two hours, plus $120

After that long read, your thoughts on calculating statutory holiday could go two ways:

  1. "Wow, I think I get it!" or
  2. "... I need to read that again."

If you haven't, that’s okay, we’re here to help. Whether you’ve got it or not, automating payroll will save you a load of time.

What are the general holidays in Alberta?

  • New Year's Day - January 1st
  • Alberta Family Day - Third Monday in February
  • Good Friday - Friday preceding Easter Sunday
  • Victoria Day - Last Monday preceding May 25th
  • Canada Day* - July 1st, except for when July 1st is a Sunday then it is moved to July 2nd (This doesn’t happen again until 2029, so you got some time)
  • Labour Day - First Monday in September
  • Thanksgiving Day - Second Monday in October
  • Remembrance Day - November 11
  • Christmas Day - December 25th

In addition to these nine holidays, Alberta has three optional stat holidays. It is up to the employer to decide to designate these days as stat holidays. If the employer agrees to any of these days, all employment standards rules related to stat holiday pay still apply for these additional holidays. The additional optional days are

  • Easter Monday - First Monday following Easter
  • Heritage Day - First Monday in August
  • Boxing Day - December 26

Boxing Day?! While we’re talking about this wonderful time of year, you may want to bookmark our Tips on Managing Staff during the Holidays.

How does an employee qualify for general holiday pay in Alberta?

Employees are entitled to statutory holiday pay if they have worked 30 workdays for the same employer in the 12 months prior to the holiday.

Most employees are eligible to receive stat holiday and receive statutory holiday pay if:

  • the statutory holiday is a regular workday
  • The employee works on the statutory holiday but is not a regular workday for the employee

If an employee is scheduled to work on the holiday and is absent without employer’s consent and employees must work their last regularly scheduled shift before the holiday as well as their first regularly scheduled shift after the holiday, if either of these conditions are not met then an employee is not entitled to stat holiday pay

For example: Joe works Monday to Friday, and the next stat holiday falls on a Friday. Joe is scheduled to work on the Thursday before the holiday, and the Monday after the holiday. He must work these entire shifts to be eligible for stat pay. Joe has requested Monday off to extend his weekend. His manager approves his request, therefore Joe is still eligible for stat holiday pay.

However, if Joe's request is not accepted, and he does not show up, he will only be paid premium pay for the hours he has worked on the stat holiday.

What is the general holiday pay calculation for employees in Alberta in 2022?

Calculating stat pay for our employees is a necessary and legal part of business but calculating it accurately makes your place a great place to work. Read our article here about other ways managing human capital helps small business owners retain and elevate great employees.

Public holiday pay is calculated by adding up the number of wages your employee has earned in the 4 weeks prior to the holiday from the last and divide that by 20. This is the amount of holiday pay they would receive for that day.

Average daily wage is calculated as the employee's wages divided by the number of days the employee worked in either:
  • the 4 weeks immediately preceding the general holiday, or
  • the 4 weeks ending on the last day of the pay period that immediately preceded the general holiday

For example: Peter is paid $14/hour and works regular hours 5 days per week. In the 4 weeks (28 days) leading up the holiday, Peter worked 20 days and made $1120. He also worked his last scheduled shift before the holiday and will be working the first shift after. He is eligible for both regular stat pay and premium stat pay should he be scheduled for the day.

To calculate statutory holiday pay:

  • Regular wages earned in the last 4 weeks = $14 x 80 hours = $1120 $1120 / 20 = $56 in regular stat pay

In total, Peter will be paid $56 in regular statutory pay, even if he does not work the holiday.

Do part time employees get statutory holiday pay in Alberta?

They sure do! All full time and part time hourly employees are eligible to receive stat pay.

Stat premium pay calculation.

In addition to Alberta stat holiday pay, employees who work on the day of the statutory holiday, are also entitled to either:

  • premium pay. This is calculated at one and a half times the regular wage x the number of hours they worked. Regular hourly wage x 1.5 = Premium pay.

OR

  • their regular rate for the hours worked on the public holiday, plus a substitute day off work with public holiday pay;

You, as the employer chooses which of these options will apply.

Premium pay example:

Last pay period, Jane is paid $12/hour and works four 8 hour shifts. She also works an 8 hour shift on a stat holiday. She is eligible for both regular and premium stat pay. As she also worked her last scheduled shift before the holiday, and will be working the first shift after, she is eligible for both regular and premium stat pay.

To calculate statutory holiday pay:

  • Regular wages earned in the last 4 weeks = $12 x 32 (8×4) hours = $384 + $15.36 (vacation pay, paid out per cheque)
  • $399.36 / 20 = $19.97 in regular stat pay

PLUS

  • 1.5 x ($12 x 8 hours) = $144 in premium pay
  • In total, Jane will be paid $163.97 in statutory pay

After that long read, your thoughts on calculating statutory holiday could go two ways:

  1. "Wow, I think I get it!" or
  2. "... I need to read that again."

If you haven't, that’s okay, we’re here to help. Whether you’ve got it or not, automating payroll will save you a load of time.

Download the guide here!

Click to download the 2022 guide to Canadian statutory holidays and holiday pay

Saskatchewan

What are the statutory holidays in Saskatchewan?

  • New Year's Day - January 1st
  • Family Day - Third Monday in February
  • Good Friday - Friday preceding Easter Sunday
  • Victoria Day - Last Monday preceding May 25th
  • Canada Day* - July 1st
  • Saskatchewan Day - First Monday in August
  • Labour Day - First Monday in September
  • Thanksgiving Day - Second Monday in October
  • Remembrance Day - November 11
  • Christmas Day - December 25th

Easter Sunday and Boxing Day are not stat holidays recognized in Saskatchewan. While we’re talking about this wonderful time of year, you may want to bookmark our Tips on Managing Staff during the Holidays.

*If Canada Day falls on a Sunday, the following Monday is observed as the statutory holiday. It gets “bumped” to July 2nd, but this doesn’t happen again until July 2029, so you’ve got time.

How does an employee qualify for statutory holiday pay in Saskatchewan?

All employees get paid for the ten statutory holidays in Saskatchewan regardless of how they are paid or what hours they work.

What is the stat holiday pay calculation for employees in Saskatchewan?

Calculating stat pay for our employees is a necessary and legal part of business but calculating it accurately makes your place a great place to work. Read our article here about other ways managing human capital helps small business owners retain and elevate great employees.

Most employees receive 5% of their gross wages for holiday pay in the 4 week period preceding the holiday.

Public holiday pay would be calculated by adding up the wages earned in the past 4 weeks prior to the holiday including vacation pay but not overtime and calculating 5% of that.

Peter is paid $14/hour and worked 76 hours over the past 4 weeks. Regular wages earned in the last 4 weeks = $14 x 76 hours = $1064

  • $1064 x 5% = $53.20 in regular stat pay or 3.8 hours at $14/hour

Do part time employees get statutory holiday pay in Saskatchewan?

They sure do! All full time and part time hourly employees are eligible to receive stat pay. Even new employees who have not yet worked a full 4 weeks receive holiday pay. Just calculate the number of weeks wages they have worked and calculate 5% of the wages to date.

Stat premium pay calculation.

In addition to Saskatchewan stat holiday pay, employees who work on the day of the statutory holiday, are also entitled to premium pay. This is calculated at one and a half times the regular wage x the number of hours they worked. Regular hourly wage x 1.5 = Premium pay.

Premium pay example:

Last pay period, Jane is paid $12/hour and works four 8 hour shifts each week. She also works an 8 hour shift on a stat holiday. She is eligible for both regular and premium stat pay.

To calculate statutory holiday pay:

  • Regular wages = 8 hours x 4 days a week = 32 hours
  • 32 hours x $12/hour = $384
  • $384 x previous 4 weeks = $1536 total wages
  • $1536x 5%= $76.80

PLUS

  • 1.5 x ($12 x 8 hours) = $144 in premium pay
  • In total, Jane will be paid $220.80 in statutory pay

After that long read, your thoughts on calculating statutory holiday could go two ways:

  1. "Wow, I think I get it!" or
  2. "... I need to read that again."

If you haven't, that’s okay, we’re here to help. Whether you’ve got it or not, automating payroll will save you a load of time.

Manitoba

The year may be 2022, but it should be noted that Manitoba's general holiday rules were amended as of January 1st 2018. Though employee eligibility has remained the same, the method of Manitoba's statutory holiday calculations may have been changed since you last checked. Below, you'll find everything you need to know about Manitoba's statutory holiday current rules.

What are the statutory holidays in Manitoba?

  • New Year's Day - January 1st
  • Louis Riel Day - Third Monday in February
  • Good Friday - Friday preceding Easter Sunday
  • Victoria Day - Last Monday preceding May 25th
  • Canada Day* - July 1st
  • Labour Day - First Monday in September
  • Thanksgiving Day - Second Monday in October
  • Christmas Day - December 25th

Although Remembrance Day is not a statutory holiday there are special requirements to pay employees who work that day. Also, Easter Sunday, Terry Fox Day and Boxing Day are not stat holidays recognized in Manitoba. While we’re talking about this wonderful time of year, you may want to bookmark our Tips on Managing Staff during the Holidays.

*If Canada Day falls on a Sunday, the following Monday is observed as the statutory holiday. It gets “bumped” to July 2nd, but this doesn’t happen again until July 2029, so you’ve got time.

How does an employee qualify for statutory holiday pay in Manitoba?

To be eligible for stat holiday pay in Manitoba, employees simply have to follow the "first and last" rule - there are no restrictions on how long an employee has worked an employer. In order to qualify for Public Holiday pay, employees must work their last regularly scheduled shift before the holiday as well as their first regularly scheduled shift after the holiday, unless they have permissions to miss their shift due to reasonable cause or have their employer's consent. They must also work the holiday to be eligible for holiday pay if they are scheduled to do so.

  • For example: Joe works Monday to Friday, and the next stat holiday falls on a Friday. Joe is scheduled to work on the Thursday before the holiday, and the Monday after the holiday. He must work these entire shifts to be eligible for stat pay.But Joe has requested Monday off to extend his weekend. His manager approves his request, therefore Joe is still eligible for stat average pay.

However, if Joe's request is not accepted, and he does not show up, he will only be paid premium pay for the hours he has worked on the stat holiday.

What is the stat holiday pay calculation for employees in Manitoba?

Calculating stat pay for our employees is a necessary and legal part of business but calculating it accurately makes your place a great place to work. Read our

article here about other ways managing human capital helps small business owners retain and elevate great employees.

If your employee works the same number of hours each day consistently, they get paid one day’s wages for the stat holiday.

Ex. Susan works 3:00pm - 8:00pm each afternoon Saturday to Thursday. Her Stat pay would be 5 hours at her regular wage.

For employees who work inconsistent hours or earn different wages, they receive 5% of gross wages for holiday pay in the 4 week period preceding the holiday.

Peter is paid $14/hour and worked 76 hours over the past 4 weeks. As he also worked his last scheduled shift before the holiday and will be working the first shift after. Regular wages earned in the last 4 weeks = $14 x 76 hours = $1064

  • $1064 x 5% = $53.20 in regular stat pay or 3.8 hours at $14/hour

Stat premium pay calculation.

In addition to Manitoba stat holiday pay, employees who work on the day of the statutory holiday, are also entitled to either:

  • Premium pay. This is calculated at one and a half times the regular wage x the number of hours they worked. Regular hourly wage x 1.5 = Premium pay.
  • Or regular wages for working the holiday plus a day off with general holiday pay within the next 30 days. This only applies to employers operating a gas station, hospital, hotel, restaurant, place of amusement, continuously operating business, climate-controlled agricultural business, or a seasonal industry.

Premium pay example:

Last pay period, Jane is paid $12/hour and works four 8 hour shifts. She also works an 8 hour shift on a stat holiday. She is eligible for both regular and premium stat pay. As she also worked her last scheduled shift before the holiday, and will be working the first shift after, she is eligible for both regular and premium stat pay.

To calculate statutory holiday pay:

  • Regular wages = 8 hours *$12 = $96

PLUS

  • 1.5 x ($12 x 8 hours) = $144 in premium pay
  • In total, Jane will be paid $240 in statutory pay

After that long read, your thoughts on calculating statutory holiday could go two ways:

  1. "Wow, I think I get it!" or
  2. "... I need to read that again."

If you haven't, that’s okay, we’re here to help. Whether you’ve got it or not, automating payroll will save you a load of time.

Do part time employees get statutory holiday pay in Manitoba?

They sure do! All full time and part time hourly employees are eligible to receive stat pay.

Ontario

What are the statutory holidays in Ontario?

Holiday pay can get tricky in Ontario, below you'll find everything you need to understand 2022 stat holiday pay for employees.

  • New Year's Day - January 1st
  • Family Day - Third Monday in February
  • Good Friday - Friday preceding Easter Sunday
  • Victoria Day - Last Monday preceding May 25th
  • Canada Day* - July 1st
  • Labour Day - First Monday in September
  • Thanksgiving Day - Second Monday in October
  • Christmas Day - December 25th
  • Boxing Day - December 26

In addition to these nine holidays, employers should be aware of Remembrance Day (November 11th) and Civic Holiday (First Monday in August). These dates are not statutory holidays in Ontario but some employers voluntarily give the day off. Most provincially regulated businesses still operate on these days and are not required to pay holiday or stat pay. Also, Ontario is the only province in Canada that recognizes Boxing Day, December 26th, as a statutory holiday which can cause some confusion for businesses that operate across provinces. While we’re talking about this wonderful time of year, you may want to bookmark our Tips on Managing Staff during the Holidays.

*If Canada Day falls on a Sunday, the following Monday is observed as the statutory holiday. It gets “bumped” to July 2nd, but this doesn’t happen again until July 2029, so you’ve got time.

Do part time employees get statutory holiday pay in Ontario?

They sure do! All full time and part time hourly employees are eligible to receive stat pay.

What is the stat holiday pay calculation for employees in Ontario?

Calculating stat pay for our employees is a necessary and legal part of business but calculating it accurately makes your place a great place to work. Read our article here about other ways managing human capital helps small business owners retain and elevate great employees.

Most employees are entitled to Public Holiday pay. Public holiday pay would be calculated by adding up the number of hours your employee has worked in the 4 work weeks prior to the holiday(including vacation pay but not overtime) from the last and divide that by 20. This is the amount of holiday pay they would receive for that day.

The four weeks before the public holiday is based on the employer’s work week. For example, instead of a Monday to Sunday work week, it

could be a Sunday to Saturday work week. Here's an example: In the last 4 weeks, Peter is paid $14/ hour and worked 30 hours. As he also worked his last scheduled shift before the holiday and will be working the first shift after. He is eligible for both regular stat pay and premium stat pay should he be scheduled for the day.

To calculate statutory holiday pay:

  • Regular wages earned in the last 4 weeks = $14 x 30 hours = $420 + $16.80(vacation pay, paid out per cheque)Regular wages earned in the last 4 weeks = $14 x 30 hours = $420 + $16.80(vacation pay, paid out per cheque)
  • $436.80 / 20 = $21.84 in regular stat pay

In total, Peter will be paid $21.84 in regular statutory pay, even if he does not work the holiday.

Stat premium pay calculation.

In addition to Ontario stat holiday pay, employees who work on the day of the statutory holiday, are also entitled to either:

  • premium pay. This is calculated at one and a half times the regular wage x the number of hours they worked. Regular hourly wage x 1.5 = Premium pay.

OR

  • their regular rate for the hours worked on the public holiday, plus a substitute day off work with public holiday pay;

You, as the employer chooses which of these options will apply.

Premium pay example:

Last pay period, Jane is paid $12/hour and works four 8 hour shifts. She also works an 8 hour shift on a stat holiday. She is eligible for both regular and premium stat pay. As she also worked her last scheduled shift before the holiday, and will be working the first shift after, she is eligible for both regular and premium stat pay.

To calculate statutory holiday pay:

  • Regular wages earned in the last 4 weeks = $12 x 32 (8×4) hours = $384 + $15.36 (vacation pay, paid out per cheque)
  • $399.36 / 20 = $19.97 in regular stat pay PLUS
  • 1.5 x ($12 x 8 hours) = $144 in premium pay
  • In total, Jane will be paid $163.97 in statutory pay

After that long read, your thoughts on calculating statutory holiday could go two ways:

  1. "Wow, I think I get it!" or
  2. "... I need to read that again."

If you haven't, that’s okay, we’re here to help. Whether you’ve got it or not, automating payroll will save you a load of time.

Conclusion

Statutory holidays can be confusing and a headache to calculate. If you’re doing it manually, make sure you’re double, or triple checking your provincial statutory holiday eligibility guide, to ensure everything is calculated accordingly. Statutory holiday rules vary province to province and it can cost you thousands if you aren’t careful.

After that long read, your thoughts on calculating statutory holiday could only go two ways:

“wow, I think I get it!” or “... I need to read that again.”

If you’ve got it – awesome! If you haven’t, automating payroll will save you a load of time. Statutory holiday calculations are a breeze when they’re automated! Let us do the heavy lifting – contact Push Operations for further information on automating stat holiday calculations.

Download the guide here!

Click to download the 2022 guide to Canadian statutory holidays and holiday pay

For more resources about restaurant operations, visit pushoperations.com.

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